Dating relationship violence

“A lot of our interventions assume that the girl is always the victim, but these findings tell us that it isn’t always so,” notes Saewyc.“And relationship violence, be it physical, sexual or other forms, and regardless who the perpetrator is, is never OK. Cloud State University is committed to eliminating violence in all forms including sexual assault, relationship violence, gender discrimination, harassment, stalking and other types of sexual violence. Cloud State complies with Title IX, a federal law, in addition to Minnesota State policy 1B.3.are more likely to report being victims of dating violence committed by partners who hit, slap or push them.Shaffer believes the overall decline in dating violence is positive.“Young people who experience dating violence are more likely to act out and take unnecessary risks, and they’re also more likely to experience depression or think about or attempt suicide,” she says.According to a Canadian study, severe violence is relatively rare.

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It includes a range of assaults, from pushing, shoving and grabbing to choking, burning and assaulting with a weapon.

Five percent of teens reported physical abuse from their dating partners in 2013, down from 6 percent in 2003.

But in the last year, 5.8 percent of boys reported dating violence compared to 4.2 percent of girls.

Participants were 35,900 students in grades 7 through 12 who were in dating relationships.

This is the first North American study to compare statistics for boys and girls and the first Canadian study to consider teen dating violence over the course of a decade.

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